Semi-Autonomous cars to be trialled on Melbourne’s EastLink

Thinking Highways
By Thinking Highways January 4, 2017 11:54

Semi-Autonomous cars to be trialled on Melbourne’s EastLink


The Victorian Government has announced that it is working with the Australian Road Research Board in conjunction with La Trobe University and EastLink to test cars with driver-assistance technology on Melbourne’s EastLink motorway as part of an 18-month trial.

The first of its kind research project will assess the use of semi-autonomous cars with safety features such as lane keep assist, auto braking and adaptive cruise control.

The testing will be conducted in traffic on EastLink to assess whether the latest technology is compatible with current infrastructure such as road signs and line markings.

The trial will test a wide range of cars fitted with semi-autonomous driver-assistance technology that require the driver’s hands on the wheel and are already being sold in Australia.
 
Recently, a Volvo S90 was the first vehicle to be tested as part of this project.

Following the research, EastLink will work with car manufacturers and VicRoads to ensure that vehicle technology and road infrastructure allows for the safe introduction of hands free driving.

EastLink spokesperson Doug Spencer-Ro said: “Vehicles with advanced driver-assistance technology are now being released in Australia. Within the next few years, once legislative changes are made, we expect vehicle manufacturers will activate hands-free driving capabilities on EastLink and other freeways. The EastLink trials that have recently started will identify changes that can be made to freeway infrastructure and operations to help driver-assistance technology make a safe transition to hands-free driving on EastLink and other freeways. EastLink is already the safest freeway in Melbourne with the least congestion, but we are not complacent. That is why we are already working with our trial partners to help smooth the introduction of new technology that will further improve road safety and traffic flow.”

Thinking Highways
By Thinking Highways January 4, 2017 11:54