Ricardo report explains technology and testing needed to enable self-driving car

Thinking Highways
By Thinking Highways January 13, 2016 11:05

Ricardo report explains technology and testing needed to enable self-driving car


The autonomous vehicle is moving rapidly from science fiction to reality, and in a white paper published yesterday by Ricardo – entitled Key enablers for the Fully Autonomous Vehicle – the company highlights the technologies and development processes that are needed to develop commercially feasible self-driving cars that meet consumer expectations while also achieving compliance with likely future transport regulations.

Today’s consumers already benefit from a number of active safety technologies, such as lane departure warning and adaptive cruise control. These innovations are recognized as stepping stones to fully autonomous driving, but the paper published yesterday by Ricardo explains how the realization of fully autonomous vehicles will require further evolution in software, sensors, integration and efficient system testing.

The future self-driving vehicle value chain will be driven by software feature sets, low system costs, and high performance hardware. The white paper discusses the likely winners and losers in the future self-driving car market. Ricardo also highlights the areas where the company’s core competencies can support crucial activities such as the development of complex algorithms for sensor fusion and motion controls.

In terms of advancing virtual testing and validation, the white paper describes Ricardo Agent Drive – simulation software based on agent-based modelling methodology that is used to create real-world driving scenarios to test complex driving situations for autonomous vehicles in agent-based simulation. This is under development and will be used to test future autonomous vehicle concepts. This method of testing puts agents (vehicles, people or infrastructure) with specific driving characteristics (such as selfish, aggressive, defensive) with their connections in a defined environment (cities, test tracks, military installations) to understand complex interactions that occur during simulation testing. The benefits to car manufacturers and their suppliers that this approach aims to deliver are faster product development cycles, reduced costs related to test-vehicle damage and lower risk of harming a vehicle occupant under test conditions.

“Our vision for future mobility is autonomous, connected, electric and shared transportation,” commented David McShane, vice president of business development for Ricardo Inc. “We are working with industry leaders and innovators to develop, integrate and verify new technologies that support this vision.”

Today, Wednesday, January 13 at the North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) in Detroit, David McShane will participate on the industry panel at the Autobeat symposium “Generation Selfie (driving)” to share insights from this white paper and discuss the future of self-driving cars.

To download the white paper Key enablers for the Fully Autonomous Vehicle, visit www.ricardo.com/connected

Thinking Highways
By Thinking Highways January 13, 2016 11:05