Nissan & The World’s Largest Grid-Integrated Electric Vehicle System

Thinking Highways
By Thinking Highways March 22, 2016 16:44

Nissan & The World’s Largest Grid-Integrated Electric Vehicle System


Nissan’s new regional office in France will use electric car technology to power the offices — in fact, it will be implementing the world’s largest grid-integrated electric vehicle (EV) system. Taking place thanks to the Japanese EV manufacturer, it will be another step towards a cleaner environment.

Nissan will install 100 vehicle-to-grid (V2G) chargers. Nissan’s partner Enel will provide the chargers.

140363_1_5 (2)

Paul Willcox, chairman of Nissan Europe, made an announcement about this project at the Geneva Motor Show: “By demonstrating that electric vehicles can play an integral part in the energy management systems of the future, this project is a watershed moment on our journey towards a fully electric future.”

By drawing energy from the grid at off-peak times, and using the Nissan’s electric vehicle batteries to store and transfer energy at opportune times, there’s expected to be a net benefit in selling electricity back to the grid. “It will also feature a 1 MWh energy storage system, from Nissan’s partner EATON, the battery storage experts, powered by 64 Nissan LEAF second-life EV batteries combined with solar energy generation.”

Over the next few years, “The systems which will be installed at Nissan’s new French office will serve as a live test case of what can be achieved when electric cars are used to their full potential.”

By reducing grid dependency and using excess energy stored in EV batteries in a smart way, Nissan believes today’s announcement will be a game-changer in the way people and businesses utilise electric vehicle fleets. The new technology is expected to slash energy costs at the new France office by reducing drawdown of energy during peak periods in favour of off-peak tariffs. The new energy management system will also decrease the amount of contracted power consumed from the local electricity supplier.

Nissan believes that other European cities and other businesses will explore similar operations in the years to come.

 

Thinking Highways
By Thinking Highways March 22, 2016 16:44