New receiver offers ‘on-demand’ control of LED street lighting

Thinking Highways
By Thinking Highways April 8, 2014 15:18

New receiver offers ‘on-demand’ control of LED street lighting

The technology was used recently to control the lights around St Paul's Cathedral as part of Earth Hour.

Street lighting engineers will soon be able to dim and turn on or off their LED estate remotely, instantaneously and ‘on demand’, thanks to an integrated luminaire receiver developed by Energy Assets as part of its Z-LYNK control technology.

The system will first be used across the City of London and will enable Corporation engineers to dim LED street lighting in real time via a web browser. Each receiver is programmable via Near Field Communication (NFC) to respond to up to 10 different command settings, bringing a new level of flexibility to lighting levels and zonal control.

What enables Z-LYNK to deliver instantaneous response is the use of power line communication architecture that sends command signals over the electricity network. This enables any switchable device to be controlled – in the case of the City of London, they’ve selected the system to manage street lighting across the famous Square Mile and around iconic buildings such as St Paul’s Cathedral.

“Integrating a dimming receiver within luminaires will offer local authority engineers a new level of control and flexibility over their lighting estate,” says Kenny Cameron, Director of Strategic Development at Energy Assets. “The control provided by Z-LYNK and its receiver technology augments the power consumption and CO2 benefits inherent in LEDs by enabling lighting to be managed dynamically, in line with traffic conditions, light levels or special events.”

Z-LYNK works by broadcasting command messages seamlessly from the 11KV distribution network, downstream via the 415V system to individual 13 amp sockets. In the street lighting market, it can operate in all urban environments because it does not suffer from the effect of ‘urban canyons’, where buildings disrupt radio communication.

Thinking Highways
By Thinking Highways April 8, 2014 15:18