Mitsubishi Heavy Industries completes highway traffic management system in Sri Lanka

Thinking Highways
By Thinking Highways August 11, 2015 10:15

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries completes highway traffic management system in Sri Lanka


A highway traffic management system (HTMS) delivered by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has newly gone on-stream in Sri Lanka. The installation is the country’s first full-scale system of its kind, and it is expected to contribute significantly to improved safety and reduced congestion on a local expressway.

The HTMS was installed on Sri Lanka’s Southern Expressway spanning from Colombo, the largest city in Sri Lanka, to Matara, a distance of approximately 120 kilometres (km). Construction work was performed under a grant-in-aid provided by the Japanese Government (Japan International Cooperation Agency [JICA]).

Based on a package agreement concluded in November 2013 with the Sri Lankan authority placing the order – the Road Development Authority (RDA) – MHI handled all aspects from engineering, procurement and installation to adjustment and operation training. The company provided some 30 sets of full-color traffic information signboards, approximately 40 sets of vehicle detection cameras, weather sensors and other roadside equipment, as well as the central computer systems for data processing, operating status monitoring, etc. Preliminary design work and construction supervision were carried out by Oriental Consultants Co., Ltd. and East Nippon Expressway Company Limited (NEXCO East).

Sri Lanka’s Southern Expressway opened in November 2011 and will eventually be connected into neighbouring expressways already in operation. In addition, new expressway construction is currently under way in the country in preparation for an anticipated dramatic increase in vehicle traffic in the coming years. The newly delivered HTMS is designed to provide expressway users with timely traffic information during inclement weather and when accidents occur. In this way the system will help prevent congestion and accidents caused by natural disasters, thus contributing to the realization of safe, smooth high-speed road traffic.

Thinking Highways
By Thinking Highways August 11, 2015 10:15