FLIR launches new video detection board and HD incident detection camera

Thinking Highways
By Thinking Highways April 1, 2014 13:43

FLIR launches new video detection board and HD incident detection camera


At this year’s Intertraffic show in Amsterdam, FLIR Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), the ITS business unit of FLIR Systems, announced the launch of the VIP-HD video detection board and TrafiBot HD video camera with integrated traffic video analytics.

In the camera world, HD imaging is increasingly becoming an established technology. This trend is now also continued in traffic monitoring and detection. More and more traffic agencies are choosing HD cameras to control and secure their urban and highway traffic. In answer to this trend, FLIR is now extending its portfolio with HD versions of its Automatic Incident Detection (AID) boards and cameras.

The VIP-HD detection board is a new member of FLIR’s high-performance and proven range of traffic detection modules and will detect a wide range of traffic events, including stopped vehicles, speed drops, overspeed vehicles, wrong-way drivers and traffic congestion. In addition, VIP-HD offers field-proven traffic data collection, including traffic flow data per lane, traffic flow speed, zone occupancy, average speed, gap time, headway and vehicle classification. VIP-HD has been designed to perform high-end video analytics on HD camera input and is compatible with the 16:9 aspect ratio of HD cameras.

A second innovation is FLIR’s TrafiBot HD, a high-performance HD camera with integrated incident detection analytics, powerful video encoding and streaming. TrafiBot HD offers the sharpest and brightest HD images, even in low-light conditions. The TrafiBot camera with D1 resolution (720 x 576) was launched in 2012. Just like this D1 version, the new TrafiBot HD camera fits into a wider trend of decentralisation, where intelligence is put on the edge of the network. This means that the network traffic is heavily reduced when the analytics are running on the edge. In fact, there is no network traffic as long as nothing relevant happens.

Thinking Highways
By Thinking Highways April 1, 2014 13:43